How to ensure high quality when working with a translation services provider

How to ensure high quality when working with a translation services provider

August 28, 2014 by Guest contributor

How to ensure high quality when working with a translation services providerWhen trading internationally, translation is an essential tool. Materials translated accurately by humans have the potential to greatly improve conversions when compared to computer-generated translations. There are numerous factors that underpin high-quality translation, so here is our advice if your business needs translation services…

1 Only work with mother-tongue translators

Mother-tongue translators offer skill and knowledge that can’t be matched. They have an unrivalled familiarity with their own language, and can pick up on nuances that someone who’s only been speaking the language for a few years might miss. Mother-tongue translators can ensure proper localisation. Countries that use the same language still have localised differences, of course. Mother-tongue translators will also be more culturally aware and able to spot whether words or phrasing will offend. They will also have a better knowledge of structure, because some dialects use shorter sentences, while the opposite is true for others. 

2 Proofread, proofread and proofread

Although using proofreaders has become less common as a result of the ‘digital revolution’, they’re essential when translating important business materials. One mistake in a technical document, for example, could have disastrous consequences. Professional proofreaders ensure that the translation is accurate and of the highest quality. They should prevent unprofessional-looking spelling mistakes from creeping in, while awkward phrasing or poorly written sentences can be misleading. 

3 Insist on qualifications

Your translators should have a relevant qualification or specialist certification. If someone’s made the effort to obtain a post-graduate diploma or a degree in a foreign language, they’re obviously committed to their craft and are likely to have a professional attitude to their work. Where possible, ensure that they belong to a recognised translation body (eg The Institute of Translation & Interpreting).

4 Insist on experience

Work only with translators with at least five years’ experience, which is normally enough time for them to develop their skills (though more experience is better). Try to ensure that the translator has in-depth experience of translating for your sector. If they don’t, they’ll struggle with technical terms and industry-specific references.

5 Have a firm process in place

Translation is essentially a simple process, however, it can very quickly become complicated if too many people get involved. For each piece of work, have a project manager tasked with ensuring that everything is completed on time. Also, use one experienced proofreader and give them the maximum amount of time to complete each piece of work.

6 Be wary of style

Corrections are often stylistic and therefore subjective, so it’s important to ensure that there is a specified style guide for your translation work. Your editorial style preferences should be clearly explained in advance so there can be no dispute later on. These can range from whether bullet points should use complete sentences and job titles capitalised) to font use. Even basic documents require style guidance, so confirm your preferences in advance if you want to avoid wasting time, effort and money.

Copyright © 2014 The Language Factory, which specialises in translating materials across a range of industries.

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