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Do you have to give your employees time off for bank holidays?

August 15, 2014 by Guest contributor

Do you have to give your employees time off for bank holidays?{{}}Many of us look forward to that longer break that bank holiday weekends bring, because it can provide the perfect opportunity to get together with family and friends, who we don’t see as much as we’d like due to the demands of our busy daily lives. But do businesses look forward to bank holidays?

Each bank holiday is reported to cost the UK economy £2.3bn (according to the Centre for Economics and Business Research) and they can cause a headache for business owners, with some questioning the need for so many public holidays. But the UK has the lowest number of national public holidays of all major economies, with just eight public holidays compared to a G20 average of 12. The UK even has fewer public holidays than countries viewed as stereotypically industrious, including Japan (15) and China (11).

Do you need to let staff have time off for bank holidays?

According to Direct.gov.uk, bank or public holidays do not have to be given as paid leave, but an employer can choose to include bank holidays as part of a worker’s statutory annual leave.

Most retailers are now open during bank holidays and expect their staff to work their normal or Sunday hours. However, most offices close, while choosing to include bank holidays within employees’ holiday entitlement. Most office-based small businesses close, but some staff (and many business owners, of course) work from home.

Should this come out of holiday entitlement?

According to ACAS and Direct.gov.uk, this should come out of holiday entitlement, they also state that: “Employers can set the times when workers can take their leave - for example, a Christmas shut down.”

Many seasonal businesses don’t allow holiday to be taken during the summer months, but is this fair? For parents in the UK, taking holiday during term time to fit in with school holidays means higher costs for breaks away.

How can you keep your staff happy if your business operates on bank holidays?

If you are an office-based business you might want to allow employees to take it in turns to work bank holidays or allow some staff to work from home if possible.

Speak to your customers and find out if they are working before you shut down your business for the bank holiday weekend. If you will be sitting in a silent office with phones that are unlikely to ring, it might be just as well to close down.

Other businesses welcome bank holidays, of course, because they are able to cash in on extra money being spent by people who are happy because they are not at work.

Copyright © Chinny Ogbuagu 2014, regular writer for the Pitney Bowes blog.

Further reading

Why going on holiday is good for you and your business

July 02, 2014 by Guest contributor

Why going on holiday is good for you and your business {{}}Research suggests that going on holiday not only makes you feel good while you’re away, but also helps you feel better for weeks, sometimes even months afterwards.

But how many business owners have taken heed of the advice provided by the Holiday Health Experiment, as reported in 2013 by tour operator Kuoni and Nuffield Health, which urged us to make sure we get away? Huge numbers of us appear not to be resting sufficiently and we know that start-ups and sole traders are among the worst at letting go, fearing leaving their business unmanned. 

As much as we know we need it, we can all come up with reasons not to take a holiday (‘I’m too busy’, ‘no-one can look after my business like I do’, ‘I can’t afford to take my foot off the gas’, etc). But whatever reasoning is holding us back, think again, because jetting off has been clinically shown to reduce blood pressure, help us sleep better and bounce back from stress, benefits that shouldn’t be ignored.

But it’s not just about getting away; it’s about completely switching off. Years ago it was technologically impossible to keep in touch on a beach, but now it’s the norm, with emails, text messages and social media with us wherever we go – but only if we choose to have it that way.

As tempting as it is to always have one eye on business, we are risking our health and wellbeing and thereby our ability to perform well at work if we don’t take a proper break. So, the benefits of a complete break are clear, but we are still surrounded by evidence of business owners struggling to switch off.

Earlier this year, Alexander Ehmann, deputy director of policy at the Institute of Directors, said: “You won’t be able to stop people checking their BlackBerry from the beach, and it may be necessary to be contactable in emergencies, but we’d call on businesses to use their common sense and relax when on leave.”

Part of being able to switch off is ensuring your business is covered while you’re away. Holidays are always a challenge, whether for start-ups and smaller businesses anxious about staying in control or for larger businesses juggling staffing levels. In a fast-moving, 24/7 world it can be difficult to let go, but with the technologies and services available today there’s no reason why business owners should not be able to relax and enjoy their holidays.

Returning from a holiday feeling happy and healthier makes for greater productivity and creativity, so don’t be afraid to relax. After all, regular, restful breaks are the best tonic for you and your business.

  • Blog supplied by Lisa Gough of telephone answering service provider Moneypenny and virtual phone system Penelope.

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