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Blog posts tagged Managing employees

Do you have to give your employees time off for bank holidays?

August 15, 2014 by Guest contributor

Do you have to give your employees time off for bank holidays?{{}}Many of us look forward to that longer break that bank holiday weekends bring, because it can provide the perfect opportunity to get together with family and friends, who we don’t see as much as we’d like due to the demands of our busy daily lives. But do businesses look forward to bank holidays?

Each bank holiday is reported to cost the UK economy £2.3bn (according to the Centre for Economics and Business Research) and they can cause a headache for business owners, with some questioning the need for so many public holidays. But the UK has the lowest number of national public holidays of all major economies, with just eight public holidays compared to a G20 average of 12. The UK even has fewer public holidays than countries viewed as stereotypically industrious, including Japan (15) and China (11).

Do you need to let staff have time off for bank holidays?

According to Direct.gov.uk, bank or public holidays do not have to be given as paid leave, but an employer can choose to include bank holidays as part of a worker’s statutory annual leave.

Most retailers are now open during bank holidays and expect their staff to work their normal or Sunday hours. However, most offices close, while choosing to include bank holidays within employees’ holiday entitlement. Most office-based small businesses close, but some staff (and many business owners, of course) work from home.

Should this come out of holiday entitlement?

According to ACAS and Direct.gov.uk, this should come out of holiday entitlement, they also state that: “Employers can set the times when workers can take their leave - for example, a Christmas shut down.”

Many seasonal businesses don’t allow holiday to be taken during the summer months, but is this fair? For parents in the UK, taking holiday during term time to fit in with school holidays means higher costs for breaks away.

How can you keep your staff happy if your business operates on bank holidays?

If you are an office-based business you might want to allow employees to take it in turns to work bank holidays or allow some staff to work from home if possible.

Speak to your customers and find out if they are working before you shut down your business for the bank holiday weekend. If you will be sitting in a silent office with phones that are unlikely to ring, it might be just as well to close down.

Other businesses welcome bank holidays, of course, because they are able to cash in on extra money being spent by people who are happy because they are not at work.

Copyright © Chinny Ogbuagu 2014, regular writer for the Pitney Bowes blog.

Further reading

Does Fido have the Midas touch?

July 03, 2014 by Guest contributor
Does Fido have the Midas touch?{{}}
Bruce, our very own Atom office dog

The national campaign, Bring your Dog to Work Day, launched on 27 June. It raises proceeds for three major animal welfarecharities and encourages businesses to allow dogs in the work place.

The number of UK businesses with office dogs is increasing. A canine mascot is a common addition to the open plan workspace of many a trendy start-up. But, more than just a fashion accessory, the presence of a dog in the office may have a real impact on employee efficiency and wellbeing. Here’s the evidence:

Happier employees are more efficient employees

Countless studies suggest that people who are content in their job are more productive and animal/human interaction has been shown to dramatically lower stress and anxiety.

The National Canine Research Council describes how people who take their dogs to work experience lower stress and increased work satisfaction than employees who don’t take pets to work. The use of dogs in care homes, rehabilitation centres and court rooms in the USA is increasing because it has been proven they contribute to lower blood pressure, faster recovery from surgery and increased oxytocin levels, as well as reducing depression, while increasing self-esteem.

Healthier employees equals less downtime

Across the board, dogs in the office can keep the team fitter with a mix of fresh air, exercise and stronger immunity.

Many companies now run dog-walking schemes, where employees sign up to a dog-walking rota. Plus, dogs bring a taste of the wild into a clinical office environment in the form of bacteria we would not otherwise have contact with. Scientists at Your Wild Life carried out studies that found that doggy germs (which, contrary to expectations were not from ‘doggy doings’) help to improve immunity and can reduce allergies and wheezing.

Humanise the workplace and improve company culture

Dogs can help us make friends with each other. Researchers at Central Michigan University found that dogs in the workplace may act as social catalysts and encourage collaboration and bonding. In experiments, people were asked to complete a group task: those groups with a dog in their midst scored higher than teammates in terms of trust, team cohesion, and intimacy.

The workplace can be a dispassionate landscape, where people use language that is corporate and alienating. Throw a dog into the mix and the ice is immediately broken, with a disarming canine cocktail of crotch sniffing, face licking and lashings of affection, regardless of the recipient’s status!  

Leaving a dog alone at home can cause it undue stress and anxiety, and the more businesses allow dog-owning employees to bring their dogs to work, the less dogs will suffer or be taken to rescue homes.

  • Blog supplied by Tara Gould, who writes for VWHeritage (“where dogs rule in the office”).

Further reading

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