Five things Mark Prisk should (re)learn about small firms

By: Kate Horstead

Date: 2 July 2010

Business and enterprise minister, Mark Prisk, carried out his first day of “work experience” at small firms this week. This is possibly just a PR stunt, as he has already run his own business and surely knows the score, but his knowledge may be rusty and there are some vital lessons he should learn.

Here are five things he should remind himself of during his time with small firms:

1 Time is precious. Small firms are often run by one or two people, who, alongside keeping the business afloat, clearly don’t have time to battle their way through reams of admin and study the small print of new legislation. Hopefully Mr Prisk will be reminded to keep red tape to a minimum during this Parliament, and make sure any new requirements are accessible and clear.

2 Every business is different. There is no ‘typical’ small business and so the new coalition Government should avoid a one-size-fits-all approach to policy. An MOT garage may have very different needs to a social enterprise caring for disadvantaged children, but both are important to society and neither should be ignored when decisions are made at the top.

3 Small businesses create jobs. If given the environment in which to flourish, for example access to finance and low taxes, many viable start-ups will soon grow and play their part in stamping out unemployment. At a time when we are witnessing record unemployment levels, it makes sense to help small businesses become growing businesses, by ensuring the support is there if they need it.

4 Innovation flourishes in smaller firms. As they aren’t as tied down by bureaucracy and hierarchy, most small firms tend to be more innovative than their larger counterparts. While creative people must be self-motivated, the coalition Government should do all it can to encourage investment in, and the development of, new ideas.

5 There’s no rest for the small business owner. Running a small business is like working on a never-ending election campaign. Particularly in the early stages, small business owners think about their work 24/7, and once they have pleased all the customers, negotiated with suppliers, and got all their books up to date, an early night is a rarity. Mark Prisk and his team should recognise the role played by these dedicated people, small business owners and employees alike, in keeping the UK economy going. 

What essential lessons do you think Mark Prisk could learn while he’s making the tea?

Kate Horstead, business writer and member of the Start Up Donut team

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