Courtesy navigation

Experts Blog

Displaying 13 to 18 of 854 results

Getting the right technology to enable your employees to work flexibly

August 13, 2014 by Guest contributor

Getting the right technology to enable your employees to work flexibly {{}}

The right for employees to request flexible working is now in full force. With these new regulations, the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills predicts that up to 20 million people across the country could be asking their employees to work flexibly. Employers can reject these requests, but whether they do or not, to have a happy, satisfied workforce, start-ups and small businesses must have the right technology and communication systems to accommodate modern working methods.

Recently we conducted some research looking at the working habits of small businesses and it seems that employees up and down the country are waking up to the benefits technological advances provide in driving growth.

The survey suggests that 78% of small businesses are now using cloud-computing solutions such as Google Docs, Livedrive and GoTo Meeting. The smartphone revolution is part and parcel of everyday life and increasingly in the working lives of UK small business employees, with 87% using smartphones for work and 64% using tablet computers.

To keep staff costs low, and with the majority of small businesses employing just a handful of people, only 20% employ an IT Manager, with 64% of small-business owners taking responsibility for their IT operations.

The use of technology to enable better ways of working will be important for small businesses in setting themselves apart from the competition and achieving sustainable growth. Places of work are no longer restricted to one location, and employees are increasingly logging on and working from various sites. This will only become more prevalent as the new rules around flexible working are exercised. 

With that in mind, here are a few pieces of technology advice for start-ups. As your business grows and more employees come on board, they might request the right to work flexibly, so make sure you have the infrastructure in place from the start.

  • Utilise the cloud

Little maintenance is needed with cloud solutions because software updates download automatically and it also enables access to documents from anywhere with an internet connection, which is crucial for remote workers.

  • Paper, the business resource (and cost) of yesterday

With today’s technology you can easily run a business that doesn’t depend so heavily on paper, and this can save you a lot of money. Simple functions such as using ‘Track changes’ in Word mean you don’t have to print pages and pages and then waste ink by scrawling over them.

  • Don’t worry, be ‘appy

With smartphones increasingly being used for business, make full use of free business apps such as Evernote and Basecamp, both of which let you save notes and create and share to-do lists with colleagues, simply from the touch of a screen.

Blog provided by Aisling Brennan, marketing manager of faxing service provider eFax.

Further reading

Why isn’t your business selling to overseas customers?

August 11, 2014 by Mark Williams

Why isn’t your business selling to overseas customers?18292504{{}}Sacré bleu. The All-Party Parliamentary Group on Modern Languages has asked all political parties to include a new “framework for national recovery in language learning” in their 2015 general election manifestos.

That framework should include pledges to “transform the reputation of UK citizens as poor linguists, reluctant to value languages other than English” and “actively encourage business and employers to get involved in tackling the crisis”. The good news for businesses is the group also suggested that employers might be offered tax incentives to “recruit or train homegrown linguists”.

Our less than impressive reputation for linguistic prowess is well earned it seems, with the UK lagging way behind other EU countries when it comes to speaking foreign languages. According to European Commission (EC) research, only 39% of UK adults can hold a conversation in a foreign language, compared to the EU average of 54%.

“So what?” you might say, after all, “English is the international language of business”, n’est pas?  Well, to an extent, oui, I mean, yes, but English isn’t always widely spoken in many markets and lack of foreign language skills is holding back many UK businesses – and that could include yours.

UK employers frequently bemoan the shortage of foreign language-speaking British workers. A UK Commission for Employment and Skills survey in 2013 found that where vacancies were not filled because of a lack of skills, in almost a fifth of cases that meant lack of foreign language skills. According to the CBI/Pearson Education and Skills Survey 2014, 65% of firms require foreign language skills.

Au contraire, you counter, as you sit there all smug, armed with your conversational French, Spanish or Italian. Yet many Brits who can speak a foreign language don’t put that key skill to good commercial use, and perhaps too many of us are guilty of not looking beyond our own shores as much as we should. According to the CBI, only a fifth of UK SMEs export, despite businesses being 11% more likely to survive if they do.

Readers of a Euro-sceptic disposition might want to look away now, but UK exports to EU countries alone support 4.2m UK jobs and are worth £211bn to the national economy (source: FT.com), while total UK exports to non-EU countries are worth almost £150bn a year (source: Gov.uk). The US remains the most important single market to the UK economy, accounting for £41bn or 13.4% of all exports (source: Santander UK).

The British Chambers of Commerce (BCC) recently published its International Trade Survey for Q1 2014 and it found that while 90% of UK firms have ambitions to grow domestically, only 43% are looking beyond the UK for sales, despite 55% of current exporters reporting a positive impact on their bottom line within just 12 months of expanding into new markets abroad.

John Longworth, BCC director general, says: “We need to do more as a nation to take the fear out of exporting. I speak to businesses that have full order books here in the UK and don't see why they would need to take their goods and services overseas. To transform businesses’ mindset, we need to create an environment that makes it worthwhile for them to export.

“We must invest even more in supporting and promoting international trade. The UK should be matching the resourcing dedicated to export support provided by our major international competitors. And government intervention must be more focused in areas that can really make a difference, such as providing greater access to finance to growing firms – particularly when a quarter of non-exporters say that increased funding would encourage them to export. Only a concerted national campaign and sustained investment will get more UK firms to look beyond our shores for growth opportunities.”

Even simple steps, such as creating pages in select foreign languages could attract many more overseas visitors to your website and give your sales a serious boost. More of us finally committing to learning to speak a foreign language well would also greatly help, of course.

• Visit the BCC Export Britain website for more information about how to start selling to customers overseas.

Blog written by Mark Williams, freelance content writer and editor of Start Up Donut.

Further reading

Should your business increase its prices?

August 07, 2014 by Guest contributor

Should your business increase its prices?{{}}It is only natural to try to compete on price. But what you’re telling customers is “buy from me because I’m cheaper”, when what you should really be saying is “buy from me because my product meets your needs at an affordable price”.

Where does this tendency come from? Price is very rarely the primary motivator. What tends to happen is once someone has decided to buy from you they just want to pay a bit less. It makes them feel like they got a bargain. How often have you thought to yourself: "I will only buy this product if it is at this price"? Maybe at an auction, but you wouldn’t think this way when making daily purchasing decisions.  

There have been many studies showing that a small proportion of customers buy on price and the rest for a multitude of other factors. If price was the primary motivator there would be no luxury items. Luxury items sell for high prices because they are seen as exclusive, high quality and, of course, they make the buyer feel good about themselves.

The key is to make sure that your product is unique. So why is it that some sales people are against raising prices?

1 “They go against industry prices”

Some will say: "Nobody in this market will pay that sort of price!" Alas, if the product is worth it, customers will. Many successful entrepreneurs have created extra value or new products in their industry for their customers and have charged a higher price.

A classic example is the Dyson vacuum. When the first Dyson came out in the mid-1990s it sold for £400. In today's money that is £600 at least. Yet they were snapped up and made Dyson a fortune. Why did it sell? It was different and made people feel good about themselves. A boring household appliance has been turned into something a bit cool, trendy and exclusive - a bit like Apple did with the home computer.

2 “I can’t sell expensive products”

So many sales people complain that the service or product they are selling is too expensive, but they forget that others in their team are not having any problems.

3 “It’s wrong to charge a high price”

Remember the “bitterness of low quality lasts longer than the sweetness of low price”. If you put up your prices, you will always lose some customers, but only those who have bought solely on price. So what? Isn’t it better to have a higher proportion of customers who actually value your products or your services and are prepared to pay for them? Obviously, charging more money brings in more capital, which enables you to invest more into your business. It can also allow you to cut costs as in some ways fewer customers paying more are likely to use up less of your time complaining!

How do you raise prices? 

It’s probably best that you do not set your own prices. The best person for the job is your customer. Ask them what they like and don't like about your products or services. Listen to what they say and focus on improving the negatives. Test everything and raise your prices by a minimum of 5% and perhaps a maximum of 20% on your existing offerings.

If you raise prices, make sure you have a plan. Try a few customers and see what their reaction is. Give them plenty of warning, because no one likes a surprise increase. If you lose too many, keep monitoring and adjust if necessary. Can you start charging for products or services that have previously been free?  Almost always free stuff isn’t as great as paid-for services and customers often expect this.

Where have I seen this before?

When I was selling information about businesses for sale, the yearly subscription was £165. This had not changed in many years. Our sales were good, but we decided to put up the price to £195 and this made no difference to our monthly figures of c.100 new subscriptions a month. In fact – it went up.

Three months later we put the price up to £225 a subscription. Sales levelled off, but our margin was up significantly. Our closest competitor was offering a similar and in our view inferior product at £99 a month. When the Credit Crunch hit, we lowered it back down to £195, but never back to £165. It turns out that my co-director just felt uncomfortable charging more than £200! People deemed the product to be worth it and in the end, it helped us to drive more innovation like e-books, additional products and a better website experience.

One computer consultant I’ve hired in the past was charging £35 per hour. I knew this was far too low but didn’t let on, of course. They decided to later raise the price to £45 per hour but this made no difference to me. I am actually happier because I am confident they will deliver an even better service.

Copyright © 2014 Robert Moore of KSA Group and www.companyrescue.co.uk

Further reading

What Steve Jobs taught us about not listening to his customers

August 04, 2014 by Guest contributor

What Steve Jobs taught us about not listening to his customers{{}}Steve Jobs famously said that he didn’t need to listen to his customers, because they don’t know what they wanted yet. Technology entrepreneur Alan Kay is also quoted as saying: "The best way to predict the future is to invent it”.

In a 2012 report in the Harvard Business Review, Mario D’Amico, senior VP of marketing at Cirque du Soleil, said: “Customers don’t know what they want until they see it. You can’t rely on them to decide what your next product will be.”

Is this true? Should we listen to customers or is sticking to our guns the best way to succeed?

Market research

Studies have shown that most innovative ideas come when we work alone. It can be tempting to follow your market research and adapt your original ideas to better fit the market. However, this can be problematic, because you risk losing sense of your original product and take away that which sets it apart from other products.

Apple has been a market leader for decades and has put innovation and uniqueness at the forefront of its product releases. However, Apple has gained many loyal followers and is seen as a desirable luxury brand with stylish and ‘on-trend’ products, so there isn’t too much risk when releasing a product following little market research and trials.

Cirque du Soleil is a performance art company that has always been unlike anything else, known worldwide for its creativity. Therefore, it does not rely on customer feedback – its popularity is based on its uniqueness.

It is likely that your business is unlike either of these and therefore, although their advice is based on years of experience and success, it should be taken with a pinch of salt.

So, what we can learn from Steve Jobs is…

  • Listen to your customers, but in areas of customer satisfaction and feedback.
  • If you have a great idea, release it! Don’t be put off by market research if you believe it will sell.
  • Take in mind some reports, however, it needs to be saleable and profitable.
  • Retain the product’s original qualities and uniqueness – make it stand out.
  • Not every business is going to be like Apple or Cirque du Soleil. Innovative and unique products may not work for every business. Consider what kind of business you are and who you want to be.

Copyright © 2014 Natalie Naik for Miss Macaroon

Further reading

Getting your team to trust you

July 31, 2014 by Guest contributor

Getting your team to trust you{{}}In the old days of business, a manager would command and control. He (it was usually a he) didn’t need to worry about building trust. However, today, leaders who want to drive their business forward use more sophisticated and modern methods. 

In 1990, Joseph Nye of Harvard developed the concept of ‘Soft Power’. It’s a method of persuasion that involves attracting and co-opting people, instead of coercing, using force or giving money. If you want to become a successful leader, you need to display successful powers of persuasion, and high levels of emotional intelligence. How do you do this?  The answer lies in getting your team to trust you.

1 Be genuine

There is a strong temptation, when you admire others, to imitate aspects of their personality. However well intentioned this is, your team will sense the falseness. Always be genuine. Have faith in your abilities. Without this foundation, anything else you do will be doomed to fail.

2 Show vulnerability

Everybody wants bosses to be strong and capable. You need to be able to find solutions when things get really tricky – and your shoulders need to be broad when big problems arise.

Interestingly, though, if you never show your vulnerabilities, you could forever be regarded as unapproachable and it’s difficult to build trust from such a position.

It means occasionally confiding in one or more of your team that you, too, find a particular task stressful or that you have to work hard at something to get it right. This helps people to see you not just as their boss, but also as a fellow human being with whom they can have a genuine working relationship.

3 Know yourself

How many times have you given feedback to people who have been genuinely shocked? It’s often difficult to see oneself as others do. However, the more you can see yourself objectively, the better placed you are to work on areas that might be blocking your ability to build trust.

The useful personal development technique – 360-degree feedback – is an ideal tool for this. You and your team evaluate your behaviour. You then receive a report showing the difference between how you perceive yourself and how others do. It’s a remarkably easy and powerful way of identifying where to start on self-development, to make yourself more easily trusted.

4 Give genuine feedback

The problem with giving feedback is that it’s often negative, dealing with areas for improvement. As a result, managers either don’t give feedback or (trying to be kind) give it in such a saccharine way that it’s useless. This inevitably causes mistrust, because your team members want to improve. They know they’re not perfect and they want to improve so they can enjoy promotions and increased pay.

Happily, there’s a straightforward solution. Firstly, you need to realise that the kind thing to do is to give the feedback, not hold on to it. Secondly, give feedback in a way that is received well. There are numerous techniques you could adopt, but the role of ‘framing’ is essential. By using framing, you can make it very clear that your intention is to help your employee. You ask their permission to do so. With this established, you can go on to give candid feedback. Your team members will know that you can be trusted to tell it as it is.

5 Tell the truth

Finally, always tell the truth. This doesn’t mean disclosing confidential information, nor does it mean volunteering information that could damage morale. It does mean, though, that you need the courage to say ‘I’m sorry, I can’t tell you that’ or ‘this is how it is, and this is how I’m going to help you’. The moment your team suspect you are being dishonest, you’ve lost them forever. If you tell them the truth at the right time, in the right way, you will earn their trust and their respect.

Trust takes a long time to build, but a very short time to lose. Despite the considerable investment needed to earn trust, it’s worth the effort!

Copyright © 2014 Heather Foley, consultant at HR technology and software provider etsplc.com

Further reading

What’s the point of startup accelerators?

July 28, 2014 by Guest contributor

What’s the point of startup accelerators?{{}}It’s accelerator season again and applications are being accepted for mentoring from TechStars London, Oxygen Accelerator, Dotforge and more. Lots of entrepreneurs and investors see accelerators as a vital part of starting a tech company – but are they really for everybody and do you really need to attend one?

What is an accelerator?

Most UK startup accelerators work in the same way: they’re three-month programmes for your startup that feel a bit like going back to school.

Simon Jenner, CEO of Oxygen Accelerator, the accelerator I attended, explains: “Launching a startup is hard work. All an accelerator does is concentrates that hard work and surrounds founders with people who have vested interests in making their startups succeed. Entrepreneurs who like being challenged will exceed all their expectations and thrive in an accelerator.”

Beans on toast

Most startups enter an accelerator programme to get funding. All accelerators culminate in a demo day, where founders pitch their creations to a room full of investors, vying for any form of interest that could turn into a coffee, chat and maybe a nice, fat cheque.

But don’t join an accelerator for the money. The purpose of the small investment is to simply keep you alive for the three months of the programme.

Take a long hard look in the mirror. Decide if you want to put yourself through something like this. You better get used to having beans on toast for dinner or making big cheap meals that’ll last you all week. And say goodbye to spending a small fortune on a night out. You need to live cheaply and healthily and work as hard as possible.

How it works

Most accelerators are split into three phases:

1 Death by mentor: This is the most mentally grueling thing I’ve ever done. In less than two weeks I met more than 100 mentors for 30-minute one-to-one sessions. Some will tell you you’ll go bust in a week, others will be more positive. Take the criticism well and spot the trends.

2 Build, build, build: You can’t build anything during phase one, and you now have fewer than 10 weeks until demo day, so it’s time to launch, iterate, learn and repeat.

3 Sell, sell, sell: Time to segment your team, with one person focusing on building relationships with investors, and the rest trying to make the damn thing make money.

The smooth with the rough

Deciding whether or not to go to an accelerator is down to you. On the plus side, accelerators put you and your business in an environment that will help it thrive, surrounded by experts who’ve been there. And there’s a chance you’ll secure investment.

On the downside, you will be criticised repeatedly, you won’t have a social life and it’s tough financially. For every Buffer, TaskRabbit or Dropbox there are probably more than 50 successful startups that didn’t graduate from accelerators, such as Facebook, Twitter and Huddle (and they’ve not done too badly).

If you think you’ll get value from an accelerator and know what you’ll face, you should at least apply for one – what’s the worst that could happen?

© James Pursey. You can tweet him on @JamesPursey if you’d like to know about how he’s putting his experience from Oxygen Accelerator into practice at carwow.

Further reading

Displaying 13 to 18 of 854 results

Syndicate content